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"Anatomy of the Consumer"

These series of logos were created in response to the addicting tendencies of the American consumer. Each logo is a play on current culture and the values that Americans place into modern products. This idea came from observing the variety of famous logos that are represented by animals and how users relate to that specific product. The goal of this project is not to expose these companies, but rather bring awareness to how much time and money we spend on things we don't truly need. This was a great opportunity for me to practice my anatomical drawing skills, as well as logotype impressions. 

"White Rhino"

This piece has multiple meanings that relate to today's society and how things are constantly changing. The white rhino is on the verge of extinction due to humans hunting them for their horns. The 'sport' has killed off many beautiful species in the past, and the white rhino is no exception. The second message has to do with the popularity of street wear as it moves more toward high fashion. Ecko Unltd was one of the biggest street wear brands to come out in the early 2000's and remained popular for nearly a decade. With the rise of evolved high end brands, like Fear of God and Off White, the street wear we once knew is now extinct. 

"Watch Your Mouth"

Twitter is the best place to go to when expressing your opinions or sharing memes, but it is also the home of 'fast food news'  and cyber bullying. Just like other social media networks, Twitter feeds the public fun stories of Kylie Jenner or Neymar Junior, but suppresses the vital information of corrupt politics and unjust governments despite it being one the largest communities of the world. 

"Exclusive"

A Bathing Ape (aka Bape) is a Japanese urban brand that has been able to survive the ever changing street wear industry. Much like Mcdonalds, Bape aims for their targets early on in life in hopes to create a lifelong customer with their fun loving mascot, Milo. Limited runs on overpriced Bape gear has kept kids coming back to the brand every season due to their early exposure and 'coolness' factor. Hypebeasts everywhere get stuck in this never ending loop of copping the newest collaboration without really checking their wallets first. 

"Only When I'm Drunk"

We are all well aware of the effects of alcoholism and alcohol poisoning, but our love for this classic rum can also bring out the worse sides of us. Drinking with friends can be fun, but we all have a story where one has drank a little too much, and often becomes the center of attention. Alcohol deters our thoughts and often makes one feel like the only person that truly matters in that moment, which can lead to violent actions, distorted views, and selfish tendencies.  

"I Quit"

This is a personal piece as I do struggle with nicotine on a daily basis. The reason I smoke every so often is due to high stress levels and suppressed anger, which cigarettes can often overcome. Although the feeling may be relaxing for a few minutes, it never really fixes the problem and leaves me still wanting more. 

"Vanilla Scent"

Mike Jeffries, owner of Abercrombie and Fitch, is basically the Trump of apparel brands. There are endless quotes on how he only wants a certain demographic wearing the company's clothes, and he's nowhere near ashamed of it. He often embraces this artificial culture in hopes that the brand won't be tainted with 'uncool and ugly kids.' The fact that his marketing strategy is actually effective is the perfect example of America's twisted beauty standards for children and young adults. 

"Ride or Die"

This pieces relates to the sponsored athletes that are often dropped by skate companies once they injure themselves. Skateboard brands like Spitfire and GIRL have been known to cut off sponsored skaters as soon as they find out they can't hop on a board within the next few years. This common process also relates to other athletic brands and their willingness to let go of injured athletes without question. 

"Housebunny"

Playboy is a men's entertainment magazine that provides illustrious photos of silicone breasts and plumped lips. The women that work at Playboy Mansion have to abide by strict rules in order to keep their job. Manicured hands, long hours standing in heels, and addressing all male employees in a "cheerful, cooperative manner" are some of the bunnies' responsibilities. The lifestyle that Playboy portrays of women is not only demeaning, but misogynistic and controlling as the female workers try their hardest to maintain the unrealistic Playboy image. 

"Dead Bull"

Energy drinks are known to be refreshing, delicious, and stimulating, but can also do major damage on the human body. The acidity of energy drinks can cause harm to bone, muscle, and brain health, all while also being quite addictive. After drinking one can, users start to feel withdrawal symptoms in only 12 hours, making it seem comparable to drugs like nicotine. Red Bull's effective marketing strategies toward teenagers and young adults can cause physical and mental impairment on their growing bodies as they sip on a can that supposedly "gives you wiiiings."

"Slow Down"

Ferrari may be one of the most aesthetic car brands to date, but they can no longer hold the title of super car drag race champion. Tesla has passed Ferrari in multiple factors, including speed, performance, and sustainability. The only reason people buy a Ferrari is to show off their wealth and status, but realistically, the car becomes existentially expensive due to the outrageous amount of maintenance needed to keep it looking new. Having a beautiful car may be impressive to friends, but owning one is basically having the title of arrogance on wheels. 

"Race-ish"

Fox Racing is an athletic brand that focuses on motocross apparel and gear. The main demographic for Fox Racing are strong, athletic men who are often referred to as "bros." These specimen of males spend heavy cash on the sport of motocross in hopes to be part of a larger community. Much like a college fraternity, racers often find themselves having to prove their worth to other established racers before being allowed to ride with them on the track.